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Tartan Ferret
Test

Semi formal & casual

Argyll
Left. The Argyll jacket is an extremely useful addition to the wardrobe in that it can be worn for semi formal occasions during the day but is also suitable for evening events where wearing anything more formal would be out of place. The custom seems to have arisen at weddings, that Prince Charlie jackets (coatees) are essential wear for the groom and his best man - no doubt because that's what kilt hire shops stock in great numbers. The Argyll jacket would often be much more in keeping with the event and is certainly worth serious consideration.
The Argyll is longer than the Prince Charlie and has a double vent at the back and is normally worn open although it can be fastened at the top button. It's seen most frequently in black barathea but other coloured barathea and other fabrics such as velvet can also be used and it can be worn with a matching or tartan waistcoat as an optional extra. Photo Kinloch Anderson.

Inverness capeRight. This is an appropriate moment to introduce what is undoubtedly the most elegeant of outer garments - the Inverness Cape. If it should rain in Scotland (which has been known) or the temperature drops to a chill, it offers the most fashionable and practical protection. Made famous by the fictional Sherlock Holmes it's suitable for both men and women and comes in a wide range of fabrics, waterproof nylon (universally adopted by pipe bands the world over), Gore-Tex, 100% wool barathea, tweeds and even in the famous Harris Tweed.

Unlike most raincoats and overcoats, the Inverness cape has no sleeves but has a wide cut in the sides to accommodate the arms. This allows the wearer to access a sporran without unbuttoning and opening up the cape. Photo Kinloch Anderson.

Tweed Argyll jacket


Left
. This is an extremely useful jacket for Highland Dress daywear and looks particularly good in green or blue Lovat tweed. It's frequently seen at weddings in a plain charcoal grey which offers a very welcome change from the ubiquitous Prince Charlie. Photo Kinloch Anderson.

 


Lovat waistcoat

 

 

Right. Tweed waistcoats are a great investment that can be worn with their matching day jacket or used separately as a 'cool' addition to the casual wordrobe. Photo Kinloch Anderson.

Jacobite shirt

 

 


Left
. Jacobite shirts are very popular with younger Highland dress wearers but  care should be taken in choosing one - the style suits some fabrics better than others and a good cotton or linen shirt will look much more in keeping than some of the 'shinier' fabrics. Photo Kinloch Anderson.

 





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